James C. Klotter

A New History of Kentucky

When originally published, A New History of Kentucky provided a comprehensive study of the Commonwealth, bringing it to life by revealing the many faces, deep traditions, and historical milestones of the state. With new discoveries and findings, the narrative continues to evolve, and so does the telling of Kentucky’s rich history. In this second edition, authors James C. Klotter and Craig Thompson Friend provide significantly revised content with updated material on gender politics, African American history, and cultural history. This wide-ranging volume includes a full overview of the state and its economic, educational, environmental, racial, and religious histories.
James C. Klotter
James C. Klotter is the author, coauthor, or editor of some twenty books, including texts used for Kentucky history classes at the elementary, secondary, and college level. Among his works are Henry Clay: The Man Who Would Be PresidentKentucky Justice, Southern Honor, and American Manhood; and Kentucky: Portrait in Paradox, 1900–1950. The past executive director of the Kentucky Historical Society, he is professor emeritus of Georgetown College and the State Historian of Kentucky.

Other Books by this Author

Charismatic, charming, and one of the best orators of his era, Henry Clay seemed to have it all. He offered a comprehensive plan of change for America, and he directed national affairs as Speaker of the House, as Secretary of State to John Quincy Adams–the man he put in office–and as acknowledged leader of the Whig party. As the broker of the Missouri Compromise and the Compromise of 1850, Henry Clay fought to keep a young nation united when westward expansion and slavery threatened to tear it apart. Yet, despite his talent and achievements, Henry Clay never became president. Three times he received Electoral College votes, twice more he sought his party’s nomination, yet each time he was defeated. Alongside fellow senatorial greats Daniel Webster and John C. Calhoun, Clay was in the mix almost every moment from 1824 to 1848. Given his prominence, perhaps the years should be termed not the Jacksonian Era but rather the Age of Clay. 

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